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ABC
Nov 3, 2009 7:00am EST
her life. patrick swayze's wife, lisa niemi on the love story and lessons about grief as she joins us ahead. and it's so good to have you with us. good morning, america. diane sawyer with robin roberts on this tuesday, november 3rd, 2009. another election day. >> not exactly super tuesday but a few tight races across the country closely being watched for what could be an indication of the country's political mood and the obama administration. >> new jersey and virginia and a special congressional election has vice president biden in a public sparring match with sarah palin. for more to john berman. good morning, john. >> reporter: good morning, diane. from watertown, new york, where the polls are now open. this is ground zero for one of the most contentious races in the country. it's also the site of the latest debate between joe biden and sarah palin. palin versus biden. sound familiar? no, not a replay of last year but proof that in the final minutes of this campaign the big guns are showing up big time. the neck and neck governor's race has pundits buzzing and presidents calling
ABC
Nov 12, 2009 11:35pm EST
forced to change their ways? lisa ling investigates. >>> plus, sweet dreams. we take an exotic journey to a birthplace of chocolate. could this be the finest tasting confection in the entire world? >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, martin bashir and cynthia mcfadden in new york city, this is "nightline," november 12th, 2009. >> good evening, i'm terry moran. and, we're going to begin tonight with a legitimate health crisis in this country. two-thirds of americans are either overweight or down right obese, and that is a staggering statistic when you think about it. one that continues to rise. anyone who's struggled to lose weight knows just how hard it can be. there's an entire industry worth tens of billions of dollars built around slimming down. so, no wonder pharmaceutical companies are searching for that magic pill, a silver bullet to win the battle of the bulge. brian rooney has tonight's report. >> reporter: at age 60, and 177 pounds, meg evans of san diego somehow has enough agility to play goalie for her amateur sommer team. she's been an ath
ABC
Nov 20, 2009 4:30am EST
as lisa stark reports, this is not the first time that such an incident has happened. and there are concerns about how something like this could impact passenger safety. >> reporter: as planes began backing up around the country, on the ground and in the air, the faa scrambled to unravel the glitch in the air traffic control system. >> i just walked in the airport. looked at the board and said your flight's canceled. >> i'm tired and i'm frustrated. >> reporter: no one was going anywhere fast. extensive delays stretched from new york to atlanta to houston. by 1 calculation, the glitch may have caused as many as 2,000 flight delays. the problem began shortly after 5:00 a.m. eastern, when a single circuit board failed in a air traffic control center in salt lake city. it meant controllers around the nation were no longer receiving information about flights electronically. instead, they had to resort to phone calls and manually imputing flight information into their computers. >> you have to type it into the computer. it's time consuming and cumbersome. rather than the computer transfe
ABC
Nov 4, 2009 4:30am EST
government should step in. here's lisa stark. >> reporter: "consumer reports" says the results of its bpa tests offer a snapshot of what consumers will find in the grocery store. and they say it is not a pretty picture. >> consumer cannot tell how much bpa may have gotten into the food in any canned food item that they pick up, and the story here is, you don't know, and you can't know. >> reporter: bpa is a chemical that has long been used in everything from baby bottles to the lining of canned goods. some studies have linked bpa exposure to reproductive problems and increased risk of cancer and diabetes. consumers union found the highest levels in canned goods, del monte green beans and progresso vegetable soup. >> one serving for a small child of those green beans cld cause that child to ingest a dose close to the level that already causes harm in animal studies. >> reporter: the test even found the chemical in vital choice canned tuna, marketed as bpa free. the company says it is dismayed and is determined to find the source of the problem. it was a different story in paper products. n
ABC
Nov 5, 2009 4:30am EST
control of the key drug needed to treat them. more, now, with abc's lisa stark. >> reporter: with so many children fighting the h1n1 virus there has been a huge demand for the liquid pediatric version of tamiflu. the government has released its entire emergency supply. >> one of the reasons to release the stockpile is to make sure no child is not without medicine. it's hard to quantify the shortage. but at this maryland pharmacy they're only able to get enough for about one patient a month. so, pharmacists are making their own liquid tamiflu by taking powerful adult capsules and deleting them. >> it has to be made this way for the foreseeable future. >> reporter: why the shortage of tamiflu? roche pharmaceuticals bought the license to make tamiflu. they didn't invent it but bought the license to make this now critical drug. it's become a huge moneymaker. sales quadrupled over the last year. despite the shortage of liquid tamiflu, roche said there's plenty of capsules for adults and children, and it's confident it can continue to meet u.s. supply requirements. but what if roche falls
ABC
Nov 2, 2009 6:30pm EST
investigate any bad reaction that might be linked to the vaccine. here's lisa stark. >> reporter: in a washington, d.c. conference room today, experts from around the country gathered to scour for even the smallest clues that the h1n1 vaccine is causing dangerous reactions. dr. bruce gellin is the government's point man on vaccines, and says of the over millions who have received the vaccine so far there have been only 302 reported side effects. >> mostly sore arms, malaise, fever, things like that. >> reporter: so nothing that would raise a red flag to say, "uh-oh, this vaccine may not be safe." >> we're looking hard. we have many different systems in place. so far, we haven't seen anything that worries us. >> reporter: the government's massive surveillance effort involves cross checking lists of those who have received the vaccine with any later reports of health problems. data will come from health records from the department of defense, veteran affairs, the indian health service, medicare, and even from private health care plans covering 20 million americans. doctors and the public
ABC
Nov 4, 2009 7:00am EST
tragedy that is shaking a campus and a community. lisa fletcher has the latest from dickinson, north dakota. >> i'm kyrstin's father age today is probably the worst day of my life. >> reporter: the outpouring of grief rivaled only by the outpouring of support as this small campus bands together reacting to the shocking news, the tragic deaths of three college softball players. kyrstin gemar, afton williamson and ashley neufeld. >> they were really close. >> ashley loved this school and this was her family away from home. >> reporter: the three best friends went missing over the weekend. the only clue, a frantic distress call to a friend that abruptly cut out. police say the chilling call came from their sinking jeep. they were trapped inside. the friend called 911. police immediately put out a bulletin. >> please be on the lookout for a white 1997 jeep cherokee with california plates. the streak has possibly three female occupants. please check areas around water, dam, lakes and rivers. >> reporter: after nearly two days of massive searches police discovered tire tracks that l
ABC
Nov 5, 2009 3:05am EST
shortage of it because just one company makes it. lisa stark has details. >> reporter: with so many children fighting the h1n1 virus, there has been a huge demand for the liquid pediatric version of tamiflu. the government has now released its entire emergency supply. >> one of the reasons to release the stockpile is to make sure that no child is without medicines who needs to have medicines. >> reporter: it's hard to quantify exactly how much of a shortage there is of the pediatric tamiflu. at this maryland pharmacy, they're only able to get enough for about one patient a month. so pharmacists are making their own children's liquid tamiflu by taking the more powerful adult capsules and diluting them. >> this has to be made this way for the foreseeable future. >> reporter: why the shortage of tamiflu? the drug is made by just one company, roche pharmaceuticals. roche didn't invent tamiflu but bought the license to manufacture this now-critical drug. it's become a huge moneymaker. sales quadrupled over the past year. despite the shortage of liquid tamiflu, roche says there are plenty
ABC
Nov 5, 2009 11:00pm EST
news around the nation. . >> i think she should lose her job. >> lisa claims her 6-year-old daughter's teacher allowed the little girl to clean up another students's urine. according to the police report in west beach, florida, she found the urine on the floor and told her teacher who offered her a reward for cleaning it up. >> it worries me because she has a stack this big and i'm imagining if she did that what else can she do for that stack of, you know, dolphin cards. >> reporter: the teacher admits to making a poor decision but says she didn't mean to harm anyone. >>> speaking of things that make you go oooh, gross. >> the whole building shook. there's ice everybody and we're looking up and think oh my god what came out of the sky. >> at least this ice isn't blue but i wouldn't be touching it. a huge chunk came down, and it's low catted near one of the flight paths for o'hare. and not ice but fire. homes shook after a natural gas pipeline exploded. three people were hurt, one house was destroyed. . >> you're so right. you can see just a little bit of sprinkles on the car
ABC
Nov 19, 2009 6:30pm EST
the country were a lot longer. and it's not the first time this has happened. here's lisa stark. >> reporter: as planes began backing up around the country, on the ground and in the air, the faa scrambled to unravel the glitch in the air traffic control system. >> it looked at the board, said your flight is canceled. >> i'm tired. and i'm frustrated. >> reporter: no one was going anywhere fast. extensive delays stretched from new york to atlanta to houston. by one calculation, the glitch may have caused as many as 2,000 flight delays. the problem all began shortly after 5:00 a.m. eastern when a single circuit board failed in a computer center in salt lake city. it meant controllers around the nation were no longer receiving information about flights electronically. instead, they had to resort to phone calls and manually imputing flight information into their computers. >> you have to type it into the computer. it's time consuming and cumbersome rather than the con qumer transferring that data around from air traffic control facility to facility. >> reporter: abc news has learned
ABC
Nov 3, 2009 4:30am EST
effects. so far, there is nothing out of line. here's lisa stark. >> reporter: in a washington, d.c., conference rooms, experts around the country gathered to scour for the smallest clues that the vaccine is causing reactions. government's pointman on the vaccine says millions who have received the vaccine so far, only 302 reported side effects. nothing that would raise a red flag to say, this vaccine may not be safe. >> we're looking hard. we have many systems in place. >> reporter: the government's massive surveillance effort involves cross-checking lists of those who have received the vaccine with later side effects. private heaeah care plans covering 20 million americans. doctors in the public can report side effects to a government vaccine data bababs. rampd out to handle 1,000 reports per day there's skepticism. nearly a one-third of americans believe that the vaccine is not safe. it's still unclear what went so wrong. the government insist today's vaccine are much safer but wants to ensure no repeat. >> we're going to continue to look. we don't expect toee much. >> reporter:
ABC
Nov 19, 2009 7:00am EST
correspondent lisa stark on the phone with us. what do we know? >> reporter: well, chris, what we know is that a computer that inputs flight plans, electronically so the controllers have those flight plans apparently there's some glitch in that computer right now. it may have failed entirely. other reports there's just something going on that the faa can't figure out but the bottom line is that no electronic flight plans are being put into this computer. that means controllers have to input all the flight information manually and that is causing delays nationwide everywhere around the country according to the faa. >> lisa, any sense of how long or whether or not you should even go to the airport? >> reporter: well, i think flights are taking off but they are being delayed. you might want to check with your carrier to see how delayed. what we're told by controllers, for example, is that at new york's jfk airport they're operating only at about 40% to 50% of efficiency. they're have to go to spread planes out in the air about twice the distance that they usually do so there is definitely
ABC
Nov 13, 2009 7:00am EST
today for lying to authorities. lisa fletcher has more in ft. collins, colorado. good morning, lisa. >> reporter: good morning, robin. these pleas are part of a plea deal with the prosecutor's office. without it, the charge against richard heene carried a six-year prison term and a $500,000 fine. that said, both the heenes may still face jail time. the heenes will plead guilty this morning to charges related to the most-famous hoax in recent memory. as part of the plea deal, mayumi, a japanese citizen, won't be deported. in an aft, mayumi heene admitted she told her children to lie to authorities and to the media. >> a search is under way for a 6-year-old boy who may or may not have climbed into a homemade helium balloon. >> reporter: it's an image that captivated the country. transfixed and terrified that a 6-year-old boy was sailing across the sky out of control, in an experimental weather balloon. parents called police. and it set in motion an exhaustive search by land and sky. even a military blackhawk helicopter deployed. all at a cost of $55,000. when the balloon was finally g
ABC
Nov 2, 2009 7:00am EST
, lisa nicole and jane krakowski joined the fun from here in new york. ♪ i've been down this road walking the line ♪ >> "ally mcbeal" hit close to home for many single career women searching for love, dreaming of motherhood while toying with an overactive imagination. ♪ hooked on a feeling yeah ♪ i'm high on believing ♪ that you're in love with me >> reporter: ally played by calista flockhart worked at a law firm with ex-boyfriend billy. it was frequently awkward since billy married not ally but georgia, the quirky comedic drama -- >> objection. >> reporter: took us all the way from the courtroom to that famous unisex bathroom. ♪ my first my last my everything ♪ >> reporter: with a complicated character who made "time" magazine famously ask is feminism dead? now seven years after the series wrap, the original cast is back for their very first reunion ever. you haven't seen each other for awhile. and you're all having this kind of emotional reunion kind of thing. >> it is a little surreal. we're seeing each other a lot of us for the first time in many years. you know, fortunate
ABC
Nov 1, 2009 6:30pm EST
then. what's this? lisa, your family thinks you might have "roasterphobia." i'm not roasterphobic... maybe a little. well, there's always my perdue® oven ready roaster. but that's a whole chicken. it's okay, dear. my perdue® oven ready roaster is already seasoned in its own cooking bag. and it cooks in about half the time. it's that easy. my work here is done. (announcer) perdue® oven ready roaster. the cure for roasterphobia.
ABC
Nov 12, 2009 3:05am EST
illnesses and deaths. >> lisa stark reports from pennsylvania where vaccine production is stepping up. >> reporter: the new numbers expected from the centers for disease control today are likely to say some 4,000 americans have now died from the h1n1 flu. that's three times as many as earlier estimates. now, the cdc says that's not because the epidemic is more deadly than thought, but simply that they are recalculating the numbers to get a more accurate picture of the toll of this flu. the new numbers expected from the cdc will be based on a computer model looking at surveillance systems that the cdc uses to track influenza. systems such as hospitalizations, lab testing, and emergency room visits. the best protection remains the vaccine. and there are still long lines to get it. here at sanofi pasteur, they are working 24 hours a day, seven days a week. this is the only company that is making the h1n1 shot in the united states. and has produced half of the nation's supply so far. sanafi promised 20 million doses by the end of october but delivered 17 million. health officials blame
ABC
Nov 11, 2009 4:30am EST
officials. a spokesperson for blackwater said the claims were false. >>> lisa nowak has pleaded guilty in connection to a bizarre plot of attacking a romantic rival. nowak, who drove cross-country who confront shipman, must serve one year of probation. >>> michael jackson's father will have to drop his challenges against the executivers of his son's will. a los angeles judge says joe jackson does not stand to inherit any of michael's assets. but jackson said his son had been supporting him. so, the judge is allowing him to seek a monthly allowance from the estate. >>> for most of us, a sneeze is nothing more than a minor annoyan annoyance. but for 12-year-old lauren johnson, it's a way of life. the virginia girl sneezes about 12,000 times every day. this started about two weeks ago, when the sixth grader came down with a cold. and ever since, her parents have been trying everything to get her help, including 6 doctors and 11 different medications. >> i don't feel a tickle in my nose. a lot of people have canned me that. it just kind of constant. so, i don't really notice it. that often an
ABC
Nov 1, 2009 11:00pm EST
. now school districts are considering raising the legal drop out age. lisa silvester tells us why. >> montgomery county maryland school board voted unanimously to request the state change the law and keep students in school until the age of 18. currently, students can drop out in maryland at 16 years old. 19 states and the district of columbia now have raised their legal drop out age to 18. the national education association, the country's largest teacher's union, wants all states to adopt the policy. >> you cannot compete globally if you do not have the proper academic preparation and the credentials and so we are moving more towards a cree den that lived society and one of the very first credentials that we need to have is a high school diploma. >> reporter: the national governor's association this month joined the ranks of those calling to raise the legal drop out age. consider these numbers. at least one in five students droops out of school. nearly 5,000,018 to 24-year- olds don't have a high school diploma. and the u.s. ranks 20th out of 28th among industrialized countries w
ABC
Nov 20, 2009 6:00am EST
about top level job openings ac coring to dr. lisa, a sociology professor who has studied. >> for men they would get a tap on the shoulder, somebody would come up to them and say i heard about this opening, either in that organization or someone swr else. for women that happens less often. they would find the next job through formal channels. >> like advertisements or we shall sites but women with change that with network, seek without contacts and positions above their own ask communicating directly about what they want. >> letting other people know about their achievements, as they happen. >> building a large professional network doesn't guarantee job opportunities. for, finding a new contacts led to suck glees it is important no matter what to have other people within your infrastructure or within our surrounding within your environment to help support you. >> in washington, i'm samantha hayes. >>> remember, abc 2 news is working for you to help you land a job, all you have to do is go to our financial survival guide. when you get there, you will find tips on nailing your inter
ABC
Nov 16, 2009 7:00am EST
unveil the biggest quilt, our anniversary of earth day, right? 40th anniversary. thank you, lisa. hey, dillon, a lot of countries involved in this. can you name me some the countries. >> philippines, israel, new zealand and australia. >> wow. that is a lot of countries. dillon, i think you did an excellent job. it's the climate quilt project. want to know more about it and get your school involved it's going to be easy to do. we'll link you to everything on our website at abcnews.com. just go in there, look for it. it'll show you what schools are involved. how the project got started. what the goals are and what you can do to get your school involved. get to the boards. one or two things we want you to know. thank you all very much for even making the quilt. watching the quilt. holding it up for us this morning. i know it was a lot of work even though some are leaning on the wall a little bit. everybody else is doing the hard work. it's okay. it's all right. here's what's happening this morning, one or two things as we said. on the big flyby on the eastern seaboard nice and quiet. rig
ABC
Nov 3, 2009 3:05am EST
line. here's lisa stark. >> reporter: in a washington, d.c. conference room, experts from around the country gathered to scour for even the smallest clues that the h1n1 vaccine is causing dangerous reactions. dr. bruce gellen is the government's point man for the vaccine and says of the millions who have received the vaccine so far there have been 302 reported side effects. >> mostly sore arms, malaise, fever, things like that. >> reporter: nothing that would raise a red flag to say, oh-oh, this vaccine may not be safe? >> we're looking hard. we have many different systems in place. so far we haven't seen anything that worries us. >> reporter: the government's massive surveillance effort involves cross-checking lists of those who have received the vaccine with any later reports of health problems. data will come from health records from the department of defense, veteran affairs, the indian health service, medicare. and even from private health care plans covering 20 million americans. doctors and the public can also report side effects to a government vaccine database which has
ABC
Nov 12, 2009 7:00am EST
today. he confessed to the crimes and may be taking others with him. our lisa fletcher has more. >> reporter: paris hilton's pool. lindsay lohan's l.a. home. orlando bloom's backyard. most people couldn't get through the front door. but anyone can get a virtual view by accessing websites, the police say, hollywood's so-called bling ring, used to get up close and personal with celebrities. for a small fee, websites like this, not only take you behind the gates and guarded entries. but give you what they claim are actual celebrity addresses. and even driving directions. the crime ring, starring some of the suspects on this surveillance video, included four teenagers, who got their hands on millions in jewelry, designer clothes and artwork. 19-year-old nick prugo, among those arrested. >> i think a kid armed with a computer and a sense of adventure, you could easily find yourself in some trouble. >> reporter: prugo confessed to being part of a group that broke into more than half a dozen celebrity homes. a leaked search warrant revealed he also named his accomplices to police. maki
ABC
Nov 27, 2009 7:00am EST
this coming monday night at 9:00 eastern. meanwhile, lisa joyner, you saw her in the clip there. one of the hosts of "find my family." she's here now. good to see you. >> it's great to be here. >> you could see the emotion in your face. this is primal. you've tapped into something here. >> it's a race for the kleenex, bill. it literally is. when i tell these people, you've been sought, we found somebody, we can reconnect you, it's overwhelming. some of these people have been waiting all their life. most of their life to find out who this person is. to meet somebody who looks like them, for the first time. i remember, with ashley's case, she said. i'm polish. she never knew. >> you have no idea. this is so complicated. then, there's the feelings of the adoptive parents, right, as well? you have a personal experience in this, right? >> i have a personal experience. i'm adopted. i had a lovely home. my mother and father are my parents. we're not looking to replace parents. the people who raise you are your parents. what we're looking for is to reconnect and reunite. there's something in
ABC
Nov 17, 2009 7:00am EST
spoke exclusively to us about dr. conrad murray and this ongoing case. abc's lisa fletcher has more. >> reporter: if not for dr. conrad murray, janet jackson thinks her brother would still be alive. >> do you hold him responsible for michael's death? >> he was the one that was administering. i think he is responsible. >> reporter: in an exclusive interview with "gma's" robin roberts, janet jackson opens up about her brother's death. >> you think any others are reonsible? >> maybe. i don't know. if there are, then the truth always prevails. that's the way that i see it. >> dr. murray, what would you like to see happen to him? do you think he should be practicing, based on -- >> no, i don't. not at all. so, this could hapn to someone else? another family? huh-uh. >> reporter: murray is still under investigation here in los angeles, waiting for the d.a.'s office to announce any charges. just yesterday, he was in court in las vegas, on charges that he owed more than $14,000 in child support. >> do you agree, doctor? >> yes. >> reporter: in an agreement to keep him out of jail, murray wi
ABC
Nov 23, 2009 6:30pm EST
with a feature that's designed for convenience, but has, in fact, proven deadly. as lisa stark reports it's the latest in a growing list of baby products with safety problems. >> reporter: it's a massive recall, the 2.1 million cribs made by the stork craft company. the cribs are linked to four strangulation deaths. in a side that drops down manufactured from january 1993 until just last month. there's long been safety problems with so-called drop-side cribs, a side that lowers that allows easier access to a baby. >> the hardware can crack. a depression is made in the baby's head. the baby's head gets caught in that depression and the babies can strangle or die. >> reporter: the industry says parents should closely inspect the hardware on any crib. but insisted newer cribs that are properly put together are safe. >> i think that's the classic industry forcing the blame on to the consumer. these are obviously not perfectly safe. >> reporter: in the last five years, there have been nearly 3 million trib cribs recalled for a range of problems. why so much issues? there's a patchwo
ABC
Nov 4, 2009 6:30pm EST
, in part because one company has an monopoly on making it. here's lisa stark. >> reporter: with so many children fighting the h1n1 virus the government has released its supply. >> good to have a stock file no child is not without medicine. it's hard to quantify the shortage. but they're only able to get one a month. >> they're taking the more powerful adult capsules and deleting them. >> it has to be made this way for the foreseeable future. >> why the shortage. roach bout the license to make it. sales quad drumled over the last year. roche said there's plenty of capsules for adults and children and it's confident it can continue to meet u.s. supply requirements what if roche falls short. >> the government can step in, pay the manufacturer for the use of monopoly and produce it itself. >> reporter: an indian company cipla said it can deliver 1 million doses in a matter of weeks. the cdc has not ruled out generics and said there's no need yet. some ask why wait? >> the best course of action would take is to be very pro active and try to begin the early steps of the process now. >> r
ABC
Nov 23, 2009 9:00am EST
to watch lisa joyner and tim green's new show. it's a new show called "find my family and tim." this show tonight i have a feeling will be a tear jerker gut wrencher, am i right? >> you're like a psyche, jamie. >> most people will cry. if you have any propensity to cry, you'll cry. the great thing about it is it's tears of joy. that's the thing that we love so much about the show, how often do you get to see something so emotional, so wonderful that it actually brings tears of joy to you? >> both of you are adopted? so this is near and dear and when they approached you to do this you both jumped at it? >> i told them i would lay my body in front of a truck if i did not get this job. yes, it's a passion project. don't you think? i mean, this is something we would have done almost for free. >> we both know how much it means when you're conducting a search like this to be able to find your biological parents. and other family members. we know what it feels like. we know how emotional it is. we know all the anxieties that you have and the fears that you have and the rejection that
ABC
Nov 11, 2009 6:30pm EST
numbers? health officials are now counting deaths caused by complications related to the flu. here's lisa stark. >> reporter: the new numbers expected from the cdc will be based on a computer model looks at surveillance systems that the cdc uses to track flu, systems such as hospitalizations, lab testing and emergency room visits. it does not mean that deaths have gone up sharply. it is just a more am rat snapshot of the toll of the epidemic. the best protection remains the vaccine, and there are still long lines to get it. >> we will be out of vaccine by the time we get to this part of the line. >> reporter: here, they are working 24 hours a day, seven days a week. this is the only company that is making the h1n1 shot in the united states, and has produced half of the nation's supply so far. they had promised 20 million doses by the end of october, by delivered only 27 million. >> we assumed 50% of historical yield. it was only 30% when he started. so, the differential was not that great for us and we've been able to close that gap. >> reporter: health officials blame that on the vaccine
ABC
Nov 3, 2009 6:30pm EST
contain some bpa. an additive that's been linked to a long list of health problems. here's lisa stark. >> reporter: "consumer reports" says the results of its bpa tests offer a senateshot of what consumers will find in the grocery store. and they say it's not a pretty picture. >> consumer cannot tell how much bpa may have gotten into the food in any canned food item that they pick up, and the story here is, you don't know, and i can't know. >> reporter: bpa is a chemical that has long been used in everything from baby bottles to the lining of canned goods. some studies have linked bpa exposure to reproductive problems and increased risk of cancer and diabetes. consumers union found the highest levels in canned goods -- del monte green beans and progreso vegetable soup. >> that child could ingest a dose close to the level that already causes harm in animal studies. >> reporter: the test even found the chemical in vital choice cantu that, marketed as bpa free. the economy says it is dismayed and is determined to find the source of the problem. it was a different story in paper products.
ABC
Nov 11, 2009 7:00am EST
on a transtlarntic flight, from london to chicago, with 124 unsuspecting passengers on board. lisa stark is in allentown, pennsylvania, this morning, and has the latest for us. good morning, lisa. >> reporter: good morning, robin. it's called from bottle to throttle, the time when a pilot is allowed to have a drink and get into the cockpit. the general rule is 8 hours. united airlines even stricter, ten hours from bottle to throttle. this event apparently happened because a co-worker of this pilot blew the whistle, notified authorities. that started the whole chain of events. united flight 949, with 124 passengers and a crew of 11, was ready to push back from the gate at london's heathrow airport and head to chicago when authorities came on board and removed the pilot from the cockpit. he's been identified as 51-year-old erwin washington, shown here years ago, while in the air force. reached early this morning, a heathrow spokesman confirmed, the pilot, one of three on board the plane, was given a breathalyzer test. and found to have exceeded the legal limit for pilots in the u.k.,
ABC
Nov 8, 2009 8:00am EST
. for "good morning america," i'm juju chang. >>> joining us now is a pediatrician, dr. lisa thornton. this is so close to my heart with two little kids. so, let's talk about the risks of overscheduling. they do need some amount of downtime. what does do for a kid? >> kids need time to daydream and think and be creative and make up games. so when everything's constantly scheduled they don't do that so creativity is not as spontaneous. >> yeah, it's true. kids will play with a box if they get bored. that's good to allow some of that. >> it is, and children shouldn't feel have to perform to get their parents eye attention. so if they understand mom and dad really want them in all of these activities, they get the message it's all about them being in activity not being themselves. >> lot of it is keeping up with the joneses, everybody in your school district is doing tee ball. you feel like you have to do it, too. >> but you don't. >> what are the warning signs? >> one of the keys is that if their schedule is so frantic that you're frantic, it's probably too much. >> uh-oh. >> because th
ABC
Nov 6, 2009 11:35pm EST
don't get drunk ♪ hold my keys ♪ if you think you can do better than this lisa, your family thinks you might have "roasterphobia." i'm not roasterphobic... my perdue® oven ready roaster is already seasoned in its own cooking bag. and it cooks in about half the time. my work here is done. (announcer) perdue® oven ready roaster. the cure for roasterphobia.
ABC
Nov 4, 2009 5:00pm EST
tonight about a chemical turning up in the foods you may have stocked in your pantry. lisa stark has more on the controversial additive bpa and what it means. >> reporter: consume's union put 19 products under the microscope. they found a wide range of result. little or no in juice bock boxes or infant formula. and what they considered high levels in green beans of the vegetable soup. >> the bpa is in the food itself. we don't think consumers should be exposed to levels causing harm in the animal studies. >> reporter: it is used in lining of tin cans and plastic such as baby bottles. some studies show it is linked to diabetes. consumer concern has topped baby manufacturer of bottles to dump it. >> i'm wondering if i should buy the food for our kid. it is our kids we are talking about. >> reporter: some manufacturers are pushing back saying the chemical is the best around for food preservation and they insist there are studies that show the levels found in foods are safe. >> reporter: the chemical industry is counter acting the findings. >> reporter: consumer union admits what they co
ABC
Nov 20, 2009 3:05am EST
concerns about passenger safety. lisa stark has more. >> reporter: as planes began backing up around the country, on the ground and in the air, the faa scrambled to unravel the glitch in the air traffic control system. >> i just walked in the airport, looked at the board, it said your flight's canceled. >> i'm tired and i'm frustrated. >> reporter: no one was going anywhere fast. extensive delays stretch from new york to atlanta to houston. by one calculation, the glitch may have caused as many as 2,000 flight delays. the problem began shortly after 5:00 a.m. eastern when a single circuit board failed in an air traffic control center in salt lake city. it meant controllers around the nation were no longer receiving information about flights electronically. instead, they had to resort to phone calls and manually inputting flight information into their computers. >> you have to type it into the computer and it's time-consuming and cumbersome. rather than the computer transferring that data around from air traffic control facility to facility. >> reporter: abc news learned the fa
ABC
Nov 4, 2009 3:05am EST
name brand products studied and the consumer group says that could be dangerous. lisa stark has more. >> reporter: "consumer reports" says the results of its bpa tests offer a snapshot of what consumers will find in the grocery store. and they say it is not a pretty picture. >> "consumer" cannot tell how much bpa may have gotten into the food in any canned food item that they pick up, and the story here is, you don't know. and you can't know. >> reporter: bpa is a chemical that has long been used from everything in baby bottles to the lining of canned goods. some studies have linked bpa exposure to reproductive problems and increased risk of cancer and diabetes. consumers union found the highest levels of bpa in canned goods. del monte green beans and progresso vegetable soup. >> one serving for a small child of those green beans would actually cause that child to ingest a dose close to the level that already causes harm in animal studies. >> reporter: the tests even found the chemical in vital choice canned tuna, marketed as bpa-free. the company says it is dismayed and is determine
ABC
Nov 13, 2009 3:05am EST
face the constant risk, aids and other sexually transmitted diseases. lisa ling has a look at efforts to keep the industry clean. >> see? darren james. >> reporter: darren james once led a busy life as a porn star. at the height of your career how many women were you having sex with? >> sometimes it could be ten women in an orgy scene, nonstop. >> reporter: all part of a job darren did successfully for nearly eight years. until 2004 when darren got the call all porn performers dread. >> i get that call, everything stops. i had the virus. my whole world just crashed. >> reporter: so, you don't know how you got infected? >> i don't. >> reporter: did you infect people? >> three girls. i knew them. i felt bad. >> reporter: darren's hiv infection shut down southern california's porn industry for a month. and when his identity as the original infection was made public, he says the isolation that followed drove him to attempt suicide. >> i know porn ain't the best business in the world but it's all i had. >> reporter: darren is now campaigning to make condom use mandatory in adult film. he p
ABC
Nov 30, 2009 7:00am EST
, something malls are trying to do all over the country this time of year. here's abc's lisa fletcher on what happened. >> reporter: it was a holiday spectacular. designed to draw crowds to the mall. but something went horribly wrong. this cell phone video captured the aerialist performing without a net falling nearly 20 feet as hundreds helplessly watched. >> working over 30 feet we typically always use safeties. the net has to be a minimum of eight feet off the ground. if the net is two feet off the ground, it's not functional. >> reporter: miraculously she survived. the 26-year-old performer who is asked not to be identified is optized with a broken wrist and pelvis. she says she and the rest of the troupe know the risk is part of the job. >> these are not ordinary people. these are the top trained athletes in the world. >> reporter: retailers across the country are going to extremes in the downed economy to attract coveted shoppers. but free giveaways are other thing, a dangerous aerial show, some are wondering if that's going too far. your answer is no is. >> not at all. it is very safe.
ABC
Nov 16, 2009 9:00am EST
coming in here. these questions are -- you ready for them? >> i'm ready. >> lisa writes in and says her company is asking employees to work extra hour dose help the company get through the crisis, and she questions can my employer require me to work which n excess of 40 hours per week? can my employer require me to work on holidays, such as thanksgiving coming up, without paying me a higher rate than my normal play? what's the difference between being a team player, willing to work in tough times, or being taken advantage of. >> go ahead, nicole, fire away. >> well, my question is as long as you are not part of a collective bargaining agreement and don't have a bargains excitement, so if you have an at-will employment relationship, typically if you work for than 40 hours a week, you are to be paid time and a half, if you are a nonexcept employee. a lot of companies have overlaid off during the economic downturn, so this issue is coming up over and over again. there are certain kinds of professionals, you, for example, lawyers, accountants, people like engineers who can be forced to work
ABC
Nov 24, 2009 7:00am EST
question immediately and find an alternative sleeping space for the baby. abc's lisa stark has much more on this important story. good morning, lisa. >> reporter: good morning, robin. this is one of the recalled storkcraft cribs. here's the problem. the cribs that are recalled have the drop-down sides like this. but the mechanism can break. it can leave a dangerous gap here that the baby can get trapped in. and in fact, there have been four deaths, infants, ages 6 months old to 9 months old. this largest recall ever, raises alarms on a product parents count on to keep kids safe. the storkcraft cribs have a side that drops down, making it easy to reach the baby. but the plastic mechanism can fail. it's also possible to mistakenly install the side upside down. either situation can lead to disaster. a deadly gap between the mattress and crib. >> we have had over 100 incidents. and 15 entrapments and 4, tragic deaths of infants caught in between the drop-side and the mattress. these infants have suffocated. >> reporter: nearly 150,000 of the dangerous cribs carry the fisher price name.
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